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After nearly twenty years of exile from their native waters, alewives will once again migrate up the St. Croix River watershed. The Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) is pleased that Bill LD 72 became law today, requiring state officials to remove barriers to fish passage at Grand Falls Dam. The law comes into effect just in time as the alewives begin their up-river migration to their spawning grounds, and scientists are optimistic that a healthy run will be re-established.
Located in Resources / Historical Archives
Veazie Dam Removal Update: Progress on Freeing the West Channel
October 23, 2013
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Veazie Dam: Freeing the East Channel
On October 10, 2013 the Sargent Corp. breached the cofferdam that allowed them to remove the main section of the Veazie Dam. After breaching, workers trucked materials to the other side of the cofferdam to extend it back to the west shoreline so they could continue removing the foundation of the forebay wall, the remainder of the fish ladder, and other infrastructure near the Veazie powerhouse. The east channel of the Penobscot River at this site now flows freely over bedrock for the first time in 100 years!
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Veazie Dam Comes Down
A breaching of the Veazie Dam, lowermost obstruction on the Penobscot River, was celebrated July 22, 2013. The removal is a major milestone in the restoration of the Penobscot River.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Veazie Dam Removal Ceremony & Breaching
On July 16 2013 over 300 people were present for the ceremony which included speeches from key member organizations and partners, the Burnurwurbskek Singers, smudge ceremony, and the eventual breaching of the dam.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Maine is a water rich state, with thousands of miles of rivers and streams cutting through our fields and forests. There are also thousands of miles of public and private roads and trails that dissect the state, but in the past when it came to building crossings over those waterways the thought often was about how to get water from one side of the road to another, not about the fish trying to cross under the roads.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Friday marked the first time in 180 years when water from the Penobscot River flowed through a section where the Coffer Dam used to be, behind the now removed Veazie Dam. Volunteers worked on the shores to help save stranded, dewatered mussels.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
It's been 3 months since the removal process started on the Veazie Dam. Since then water levels up stream of the Penobscot River have dropped dramatically.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Construction workers begin Veazie Dam removal.
Located in Projects / Multimedia
Endangered and Threatened Marine Species Recovery Grant Awarded to Penobscot Indian Nation
NOAA has awarded the Penobscot Indian Nation with continued funding for their Atlantic salmon management and outreach projects.
Located in News and Announcements / News