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File application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document Rapid Assessment Protocol for Aquatic Passability of Tidally Influenced Road-Stream Crossings
There is growing interest among conservation practitioners to have a method to assess tidally influenced crossings for their potential as barriers to aquatic organism passage. Protocols designed for freshwater streams will not adequately address the passage challenges of bi-directional flow and widely variable depth and velocity of tidally influenced systems. Diadromous fish must be able to overcome the enhanced water velocities associated with tidal restrictions to reach upstream spawning habitat. This project will build on the existing North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative's protocol, database and scoring procedures to extend the applicability of this region-wide program to road-stream crossings in tidally influenced settings.
Located in Projects / Aquatic Connectivity
The Maine Sea Grant College Program = Research funding opportunities.
The Maine Sea Grant College Program is accepting preliminary proposals for research projects to be funded in the period February 2018 through January 2020.
Located in Opportunities / Funding
Project Identifying Resilient Sites for Coastal Conservation
Sea levels are expected to rise by one to six feet over the next century, and coastal sites vary markedly in their ability to accommodate such inundation. In response to this threat, scientists from The Nature Conservancy evaluated 10,736 sites in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic for the size, configuration and adequacy of their migration space, and for the natural processes necessary to support the migration of coastal habitats in response to sea-level rise.
Located in Projects / North Atlantic Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Science Projects / TNCCoastal_Resilient Sites
Habitat inventories offer new perspective on North Carolina’s coast
A feature story in Coastal Review Online -- a news service covering the North Carolina coastline -- highlights a recently completed project to inventory modifications to beach and tidal inlet habitats from Maine to North Carolina that is providing new information to managers in the coastal zone.
Located in News & Events / All News Items
File Troff document Final Report: Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS) to the Northeast
Final Report: Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS) to the Northeast
Located in Projects / Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS) to the Northeast
File CMECS Crosswalk Table
CMECS Crosswalk Table for local, sub-regional and regional scales
Located in Projects / Application of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standards (CMECS) to the Northeast
File Piping Plover response to sea level rise and development: Gieder et al. (2014), Ecological Modelling
The following article features work funded through the North Atlantic LCC: A Bayesian network approach to predicting nest presence of the federally-threatened piping plover (Charadrius melodus) using barrier island features. Ecological Modelling 276 (2014) 38– 50
Located in Projects / Piping Plovers and Sea-level Rise
Maine Stream Habitat Viewer
Maine Stream Habitat Viewer has migrated to a new website
Located in Help / Adding Content
The Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) wishes wild Atlantic salmon and those that treasure the “King of Fish” a safe and sustainable New Year. ASF has seen some success in 2013 as a charitable organization devoted to conserving wild Atlantic salmon and their environment.
Located in Resources / Historical Archives
The Atlantic Salmon Federation (ASF) is pleased to receive $174,000 for the conservation organization’s Maine Headwaters Project from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Fisheries Center. The funds are being used to build two fishways on tributary streams as well as replacing two impassable road crossing culverts with fish-friendly bridges. Together, these projects are providing access to 5,400 lake acres and 69 river miles for Atlantic salmon and river herring such as alewives and blueback herring.
Located in Resources / Historical Archives