Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Sections
Personal tools
You are here: Home

Search results

88 items matching your search terms.
Filter the results.
Item type























New items since



Sort by relevance · date (newest first) · alphabetically
File PDF document Identification of potential beach-nesting bird habitat to be set aside in municipal beach management plans
Brooke Maslo. Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey.
Located in Projects / North Atlantic Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Science Projects / Increasing Resiliency of Beach Habitats and Species
Partners identify resources for landowners in the path of marsh migration
With support from Hurricane Sandy funding, Delaware is developing outreach strategies to help concentrate efforts and funding around hot spots for marsh migration to minimize impacts on coastal communities and agricultural producers.
Located in News & Events / All News Items
This tool allows users to view aquatic barriers (dams, road-stream crossings) by the relative gain in ecological value if they were removed. Users start with a consensus map of anadromous fish priorities, which was developed based on stakeholder input as part of the North Atlantic Aquatic Connectivity Collaborative (NAACC). Beyond the consensus results, interested users can create their own scenarios by filtering input barriers to limit the analysis to a given state or watershed, changing the weights of metrics according to their importance to the analysis objectives (e.g. length of upstream network connected, number of diadromous fish present, etc.) and by modeling the removal of up to 10 barriers.
Located in Topics / Aquatic Resiliency and Connectivity / Maps
This link allows users to select the metrics that are most important to their objectives in choosing where to conduct field surveys of road-stream crossings to assess aquatic organism passage for particular groups of species, average slope at crossings, or for other considerations.
Located in Topics / Aquatic Resiliency and Connectivity / Maps
Project application/x-troff-ms Designing Sustainable Coastal Landscapes in the Face of Sea-level Rise and Storms
Under a cooperative agreement funded by the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Mitigation Fund, Designing Sustainable Coastal Landscapes in the Face of Sea-level Rise and Storms, will add needed coastally relevant information to the Designing Sustainable Landscapes project for the North Atlantic region.
Located in Topics / Marsh Resiliency / Projects
New tool addresses a big obstacle for overcoming aquatic barriers: Knowing where to start
A new decision-support tool developed by The Nature Conservancy offers a comprehensive view of aquatic barriers across the Northeast region, and an ecological basis for prioritizing which ones to target first for the greatest conservation benefit.
Located in News & Events / All News Items
Project Identifying Resilient Sites for Coastal Conservation
Sea levels are expected to rise by one to six feet over the next century, and coastal sites vary markedly in their ability to accommodate such inundation. In response to this threat, scientists from The Nature Conservancy evaluated 10,736 sites in the Northeast and Mid-Atlantic for the size, configuration and adequacy of their migration space, and for the natural processes necessary to support the migration of coastal habitats in response to sea-level rise.
Located in Projects / North Atlantic Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Science Projects / TNCCoastal_Resilient Sites
Project application/x-troff-ms Protection of Critical Beach-nesting Bird Habitats in the Wake of Severe Coastal Storms
Scientists developed models to examine the influence of landscape-scale variables like sea-level rise and beach-management strategies on bird nesting suitability.
Located in Projects / North Atlantic Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Science Projects / RutgersBeachModeling
Project iPlover: Piping plover habitat suitability in a changing climate
Designed by scientists to simplify consistent data collection and management, the iPlover smartphone application gives trained resource managers an easy-to-use platform where they can collect and share data about coastal habitat utilization across a diverse community of field technicians, scientists, and managers. With the click of a button, users can contribute biological and geomorphological data to regional models designed to forecast the habitat outlook for piping plover, and other species that depend upon sandy beach habitat.
Located in Projects / North Atlantic Hurricane Sandy Resiliency Science Projects / iPlover
Organization U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Hurricane Sandy Coordination
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service received $65 million in recovery funding and $102 million in resilience funding from the Department of the Interior through the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, for a total of more than 70 approved projects.
Located in Who We Are / Organizations